bthny:

unlikeableprotagonist:

5000letters:

bible-jpg:

Jenny Holzer

My arrogance knows no bounds and I will make no peace today, and you should be so lucky to find a woman like me 

My arrogance knows no boundsAnd I will make no peace todayAnd you shall be so luckyTo find a woman like me
Today neither will the East claim menor the West admit meToday my belly is a wellwherein serpents are coiledready to poison the world,and you should be so lucky.
All I have is my arrogamceI will teach it to lean backand smoke a cigarette in your faces,and you should be so lucky
No I will make no peaceeven though my hands are emptyI will talk as big as I pleaseI will be all or nothingAnd I will jump before the heavy trucksAnd I will saw off my leg at the thighbefore I bend one womanly knee
I am poisonAnd you will drink meAnd you should be so lucky.
Ishtar Awakens in Chicago by Moja Khaf

will always reblog

bthny:

unlikeableprotagonist:

5000letters:

bible-jpg:

Jenny Holzer

My arrogance knows no bounds and I will make no peace today, and you should be so lucky to find a woman like me 

My arrogance knows no bounds
And I will make no peace today
And you shall be so lucky
To find a woman like me

Today neither will the East claim me
nor the West admit me
Today my belly is a well
wherein serpents are coiled
ready to poison the world,
and you should be so lucky.

All I have is my arrogamce
I will teach it to lean back
and smoke a cigarette in your faces,
and you should be so lucky

No I will make no peace
even though my hands are empty
I will talk as big as I please
I will be all or nothing
And I will jump before the heavy trucks
And I will saw off my leg at the thigh
before I bend one womanly knee

I am poison
And you will drink me
And you should be so lucky.

Ishtar Awakens in Chicago by Moja Khaf

will always reblog

Reblogged from uterusfactory with 22,760 notes / Permalink

likeafieldmouse:

Alberto Giacometti - Portrait of Rimbaud (1962)
A Thousand dreams within me softly burn. —Arthur Rimbaud

likeafieldmouse:

Alberto Giacometti - Portrait of Rimbaud (1962)

A Thousand dreams within me softly burn. —Arthur Rimbaud

Reblogged from likeafieldmouse with 1,224 notes / Permalink

voltra:

Atta Kim, The Museum Project #019, From The Field Series, 1997

voltra:

Atta Kim, The Museum Project #019, From The Field Series, 1997

Reblogged from reblololo with 1,046 notes / Permalink

nr:

David WojnarowiczUntitled (Falling Buffalo)1988-89

nr:

David Wojnarowicz
Untitled (Falling Buffalo)
1988-89

Reblogged from nr with 24 notes / Permalink

noolvidensusobjetospersonales:

Joel Peter Witkin, Gods of Earth and Heaven, 1988

noolvidensusobjetospersonales:

Joel Peter Witkin, Gods of Earth and Heaven, 1988

Reblogged from persephon-y with 524 notes / Permalink

spectrumvivace:

Kiki SmithUntitled(body trailing blood)Body Politics, 1993

spectrumvivace:

Kiki Smith
Untitled(body trailing blood)
Body Politics, 1993

Reblogged from trioxic with 528 notes / Permalink


Ceci est la couleur de mes rêves (This is the color of my dreams)
Joan Miró

Ceci est la couleur de mes rêves (This is the color of my dreams)

Joan Miró

(Source: artemisdreaming)

Reblogged from caravaggista with 1,939 notes / Permalink

grupaok:

Ulrike Rosenbach, Female Energy Change, 1976

grupaok:

Ulrike Rosenbach, Female Energy Change, 1976

Reblogged from grupaok with 57 notes / Permalink

womanhouse:

Possibly in Michigan, (1983), dir. Cecelia Condit

Possibly in Michigan is an operatic fairy tale of cannibalism, desire and dread in Middle America, a densely collaged narrative in which Beauty meets the Beast in the surreal landscape of shopping-mall suburbia. Two women with a penchant for “violence and perfume” take revenge on their animal-masked male persecutor. In this contemporary rendering of gothic enchantment, victim becomes aggressor and the familiar becomes the fantastic. Condit reworks popular narrative conventions using black humor, sing-song dialogue, and ironically gruesome images. Constructing a comically grim fairy tale of dreamlike pursuit and sexual violence, she inverts traditional Freudian metaphors to impart a subversive voice to her transgressive heroines: “I bite at the hand that feeds me.” Possibly in Michigan is a classic tale of psychosexual horror, retold as an irreverent fantasy of the other.

(via)

Reblogged from womanhouse with 31 notes / Permalink

marxvx:

Queer workers at the July 1992 picket of End-Up Bar in San Francisco, holding signs and banners reading "Support Militant Queer Labor" and "Build Militant Queer Unions"
In 1992, queer workers of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) were illegally fired for attempting to organize a union at the End-Up, a popular gay bar in San Francisco’s South of Market district.
The “gay ghetto,” as residents called it, was composed of young, working class queer people who had fled abusive households, often before they were even eighteen. Expecting to be accepted in a community of fellow queer people, these young people found that their vulnerability was exploited by employers who, despite being gay themselves, paid queer workers as little as $5/hr to wait tables. As one queer IWW member said,

The real victory at the End-Up, however, is that queer workers organized to fight back within our own community. As a ruling caste, gay establishment bosses simultaneously maintain a stranglehold on the community’s resources while simultaneously proclaiming that “we’re all family.” Fiercely anti-union, gay bar owners also publish the local gay papers and own the boutiques in “our” neighborhood, where sometimes we get to work.
The unmitigated gall of homophobic bigots is matched in a very odd way by the bosses of the gay ghetto. Bashings and discrimination keep people fleeing to communities of identity in urban centers like San Francisco, in the hopes of building lives with some measure of freedom and safety. That means lots of new people, all the time, without pre-existing roots in the community and desperate for work to boot. It keeps wages low. It keeps people scared to rock such boat as there is, to talk back, or step out of line, for what such workers have to lose is their very sense of self.

Rather than appeal to the anti-labor and anti-queer courts for assistance, the queer workers championed the IWW’s strategy of “solidarity unionism,” where workers used direct action on their job to enforce their demands. Their picket lines were respected by truck drivers of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), who delivered liquor to the bar. With no liquor being delivered to the establishment and daily pickets surrounding the bar, the End-Up’s management eventually buckled, reinstated the fired workers, and officially recognized the union.
This was one of the first successful implementations of the IWW’s now-popular model of solidarity unionism, and demonstrates the relevance of revolutionary unions to queer struggles.
[a worker’s account of the picket can be read here. image from The Industrial Workers of the World: Its First 100 Years, p. 211]

marxvx:

Queer workers at the July 1992 picket of End-Up Bar in San Francisco, holding signs and banners reading "Support Militant Queer Labor" and "Build Militant Queer Unions"

In 1992, queer workers of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) were illegally fired for attempting to organize a union at the End-Up, a popular gay bar in San Francisco’s South of Market district.

The “gay ghetto,” as residents called it, was composed of young, working class queer people who had fled abusive households, often before they were even eighteen. Expecting to be accepted in a community of fellow queer people, these young people found that their vulnerability was exploited by employers who, despite being gay themselves, paid queer workers as little as $5/hr to wait tables. As one queer IWW member said,

The real victory at the End-Up, however, is that queer workers organized to fight back within our own community. As a ruling caste, gay establishment bosses simultaneously maintain a stranglehold on the community’s resources while simultaneously proclaiming that “we’re all family.” Fiercely anti-union, gay bar owners also publish the local gay papers and own the boutiques in “our” neighborhood, where sometimes we get to work.

The unmitigated gall of homophobic bigots is matched in a very odd way by the bosses of the gay ghetto. Bashings and discrimination keep people fleeing to communities of identity in urban centers like San Francisco, in the hopes of building lives with some measure of freedom and safety. That means lots of new people, all the time, without pre-existing roots in the community and desperate for work to boot. It keeps wages low. It keeps people scared to rock such boat as there is, to talk back, or step out of line, for what such workers have to lose is their very sense of self.

Rather than appeal to the anti-labor and anti-queer courts for assistance, the queer workers championed the IWW’s strategy of “solidarity unionism,” where workers used direct action on their job to enforce their demands. Their picket lines were respected by truck drivers of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), who delivered liquor to the bar. With no liquor being delivered to the establishment and daily pickets surrounding the bar, the End-Up’s management eventually buckled, reinstated the fired workers, and officially recognized the union.

This was one of the first successful implementations of the IWW’s now-popular model of solidarity unionism, and demonstrates the relevance of revolutionary unions to queer struggles.

[a worker’s account of the picket can be read here. image from The Industrial Workers of the World: Its First 100 Years, p. 211]

Reblogged from persephon-y with 1,185 notes / Permalink

highmasc:

sandyfarquhar:

my friend kaethe photoshopped me an ftm st sebastian

Omg

highmasc:

sandyfarquhar:

my friend kaethe photoshopped me an ftm st sebastian

Omg

Reblogged from highmasc with 64 notes / Permalink